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Payroll Sales Pro Issue #25--Transforming the Way You Sell to “Inbound Selling,” Part 2
July 11, 2016

July 11, 2016

It’s time to call your lead using a very specific series of calls and emails; by using these Inbound Selling methods, you will earn credibility and increase your sales with a more consultative, “buyer-centric” approach.

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Payroll Talking Points-Transforming the Way You Sell to “Inbound Selling,” Part 2: Calling Your Lead

Last week we discussed how to transform your selling methods from “seller-centric,” which is not as effective as in past years, to Inbound Selling, which is more “buyer-centric.” Your buyers are now doing their own research and educating themselves on their options. You can take advantage of this by researching your leads online, offering them information which earns you credibility, then closing the sale in a more consultative approach. The first step, which we covered in detail in our June 27th Payroll Sales Pro, was to research your leads using social media.

Now that you have researched and have some information to go on, it’s time to call your lead using a very specific approach, which our friends at HubSpot have allowed us to share here. We’ve summarized their advice below:

Inbound Selling—Calling Your Lead

Let’s go over a few soundbites you can use when beginning your connect call. Always start with the lead’s first name. You really want the person on the other end of the phone to be pushed back on their heels by your enthusiasm.

When your lead, let’s call them Andy, answers simply say, “Andy, It's Dave... at Inbound Corporation. I saw that you recently downloaded our ebook on how to generate more business on Facebook. I actually had a chance to take a look at your Facebook page and website and I have a few suggestions on how you can get more business, but was there anything in particular that you were looking for help with?”

But what if they answer, "I haven't had a chance to look at it yet, so no." Then you can take one of two paths. You can follow up your intro with a simple, “What are you looking for help with?” Or you can use what we call a positioning statement and say something like, “Ok. Well I have been talking a number of marketing agencies recently and I keep running across two issues that they are facing right now. First off, they are trying to figure out what is the best messaging to use on Social Media, and secondly, they are struggling to prove an ROI with Social Media to their clients. Have you and your team ever dealt with these issues?”

Either way you do it, the goal is to uncover their pain points and determine how you might be able to help them. Let’s break down this intro and understand the theory behind it. It’s very important to greet the prospect as if they are your best friend. Say "It's" to introduce yourself. Pause before you say your company name “I saw that you recently downloaded our ebook on how to generate more business on Facebook.” This is called the root. It helps the prospect gain context to why you are calling. This can't be overlooked.

Then you continue with “I actually had a chance to take a look at your Facebook page and website and I have a few suggestions on how you can get more business.” This is the open loop. It's an unfinished thought and gives you something you can always go back to if you get stuck later in the call “But was there anything in particular that you were looking for help with?”

This question is a throwaway question, meant to get the prospect to say no. Expect a no. And it is a set up for the next section: the thematic (in this case, social media/Facebook) positioning statement. As mentioned, that second part is the positioning statement. This is the definition of a positioning statement. It’s an expression of how a given product, service, or brand fills a particular consumer need in a way that its competitors don’t.

Focus on using a positioning statement when you want to create value around your phone call. There are three parts to a positioning statement. (1) The root which must contain a reference to talking to a bunch of people just like them... this adds 'social proof' to the statement. (2) You need to separate 'positions' so that you have twice the chance that what you say will resonate with the prospect. You should pick to very widely appealing issues that your prospects have and that your company can help with. (3) A question that asks them to elaborate on their experience with step (2). If this goes well, you will continue to ask questions until you uncover some level of need and then suggest a more formal call.

So, now you might be wondering, what happens if they don’t pick up the phone? Well, when you leave a voicemail with a prospect you’re connecting with for the first time, it’s vital that you follow up with a corresponding email, every time.

Let’s go over what those first few contact sequences might look like. This sequence is for you to introduce yourself and your company. You’ll want to explain why you’re reaching out while offering a general value statement.

Remember: leave the voicemail first, then follow up with the email. So Voicemail 1 will sound like this: Hi Andy, You recently downloaded information on blogging for your business. I’ve researched your company and have suggestions on how blogging can actually help drive more traffic to your website. Please let me know when you have a few minutes to speak. My name is Dave, and I’m calling from Inbound Corporation.

The email to follow will read something like this: Subject Line: Blogging Ideas for Driving More Traffic to your website. Hi Andy, per my message today – You recently downloaded information on blogging for your business. I’ve researched your company and have suggestions on how your blogging can actually help drive more traffic to your website. When do you have a few minutes to connect? Best, Dave

One thing to remember when writing emails: always include “per my message today” that way if they read your email first they’ll have an understanding that you left them a voicemail earlier.

Alright, let’s flash forward in time a little bit. At this point you haven’t received a call back from your lead nor did you receive an email response from them. And that happens! Let’s try giving them another call. Suppose they don’t pick up this time, either.

Naturally, you’ll want to leave another voicemail followed up by another email. This time, however, you’ll want to add some value and offer to set up a meeting in your preferred format. For example, the voicemail will sound something like this… Hi Andy, You’ve been to our website and utilized our resources. I’ve researched your company and have a couple of suggestions on how blogging can drive more traffic to your website. For example, you can help increase traffic to your website by including relevant keywords on your blogs that you want to get ranked for on search engines. I thought you might enjoy a 20 minute free assessment of your website where we can review more tips and suggestions that you can implement today. Please let me know when you have a few minutes to speak. My name is Dave, and I’m calling from Inbound Corporation

Following it up with an email that sounds like this… Subject Line: Inbound Corporation Free Assessment Hi Andy, per my message today – You’ve been to our website and utilized our resources. I’ve researched your company and have suggestions on how blogging can drive more traffic to your website. For example, you can help increase traffic to your website by including relevant keywords on your blogs that you want to get ranked for on search engines. Inbound Corporation offers a 20 minute assessment where we can review more tips and suggestions that you can implement today. When is the best time to connect? Best, Dave

Notice that both the voicemail and email get the same point across: delivering value in a helpful tip as well as offering to set up a meeting. You’re still leaving the power in the buyer’s hands. Recognize that chasing your lead is never the solution. Let’s say you’ve called for a fifth time and there’s still no answer. At this point, it’s probably time to break up with your prospect. Don’t afraid of this step. If they really want to engage with you, they won’t let you break up with them! Leave it open-ended so that your prospect can always reach back out.

Your break up voicemail should sound something like this. Hi Andy, I wanted to reach out to you one last time as I have suggestions on how your site can work harder for you. If I do not hear back from you, I’ll assume the timing isn’t right. Give me a call if you would like to speak further. It’s Dave, from Inbound Corporation.

And the follow-up email should express that you’re going to stop reaching out to them. The email also leaves the power in the buyer’s hands, letting your lead know that he can always reach back out to you if he has any questions.

We call these voicemail/email sequences an ‘attempt series’. What we just covered was a 6 attempt series: 3 voicemails, 3 emails. Now, this example can work well for you but there is a wide range of ways that might work for you and your industry, so understand that there isn’t a one-size fits-all solution.

How many times do you reach out? Always remember Brian Halligan’s quote on Inbound Selling. You want to provide a relevant, personal, and delightful experience for each of your prospects from start to finish.


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